PDF New Ages and Other Wonders

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online New Ages and Other Wonders file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with New Ages and Other Wonders book. Happy reading New Ages and Other Wonders Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF New Ages and Other Wonders at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF New Ages and Other Wonders Pocket Guide.
New Ages and Other Wonders eBook: Marcella Martyn: epatibehyg.ml: Kindle Store.
Table of contents



The rich seem either corrupt, lazy or greedy. Inherited wealth seem to be either squandered or milked by sycophants. The poor are really poor. All people seem to be looking for a way to make easy money. There are a lot of traditions, meanness and small mindedness.

The characters come from different classes, ages, sexes, fortunes. They are well constructed and generally p This is one of the best set of short stories I have read. They are well constructed and generally pretty sad. Each story is complete and there are few typical short stories surprised endings. Each ending was like coming to the end in a novel. View 2 comments. Occasionally a book makes the reader realize how little they know of its subject matter.

There is a plethora of literature from some Asian countries, particularly India, Japan, and China. But reading this book of connected stories set in post-partition Pakistan left me wondering. Placed in chronological order, the settings, lives and characters at first held c Occasionally a book makes the reader realize how little they know of its subject matter.

Placed in chronological order, the settings, lives and characters at first held close resemblance to India. I needed to adjust how I absorbed what I was reading. The way a situation was handled, the manner in which family members treated one another would put me off-balance.

In short, this was an eye-opening book. As always in a collection of stories, some were stronger than others. Overall, I felt Mueenuddin was more successful when focusing on male characters. However the plight of women, especially those attempting to become the wives, mistresses, and lovers of men of high status took center stage. And it is these women who remain in my mind. However, while reading, I was less absorbed by their narratives. I am still unsure if this was my own cultural barrier, whether I was bothered by their choices of which several had few or if the stories were less strong.

I also felt the more historical narratives were more authentic than those of the modern women. This is a personal reaction and I am sure other readers will disagree. I was unaware that this was not uncommon in the upper classes of Pakistan pre This would make a wonderful discussion book and I highly recommend it.

Most Popular Videos

Mueenuddin is a descriptive and detailed writer and makes Pakistan come to life. There's a wonderful fable-like quality to these stories glimpsing the interstices of Pakistan--spaces between the rich and the poor, the feudal land-owning class and the rising industrialists, the old and the young, the spiritual and the corporeal The stories are loosely tied together by the wealthy K.

Harouni and his large business empire which seems about to crumble with his impending death. Mueenuddin weaves a sincere sense of place, as well as a fascinating look at the dynamics between There's a wonderful fable-like quality to these stories glimpsing the interstices of Pakistan--spaces between the rich and the poor, the feudal land-owning class and the rising industrialists, the old and the young, the spiritual and the corporeal Mueenuddin weaves a sincere sense of place, as well as a fascinating look at the dynamics between people.

I am in love. Unbelievable book, this. The characters will stay with me for a long time. And such an interesting format.

Age of Wonders: Planetfall is now available!

I was so sorry to finish the book and leave the world woven within. May 18, Hannah rated it it was amazing. I've been lazy lately about writing reviews, but I feel like I need to write about this book just to think it through. In Other Rooms, Other Wonders is a collection of short stories about Pakistan that center around an old feudal landowner - a kind of dying class in Pakistan, it seems - and the many people tied to him. The stories stand independently, some short and some very long, but they have overlapping characters who may appear for one sentence in one story and then reappear a few stories I've been lazy lately about writing reviews, but I feel like I need to write about this book just to think it through.

The stories stand independently, some short and some very long, but they have overlapping characters who may appear for one sentence in one story and then reappear a few stories later as main protagonists. It's fun tracking these characters, digging back to where you've seen them before, suddenly realizing that the foolish son in one story is the brilliant man in another. Despite the fact that these are short stories, I never felt that Mueenuddin was rushing to get to his point.

There's a tremendous amount of detail and care taken with each story, as if Mueenuddin really believed his characters' lives depended on what he wrote. And the details never felt to me like a burden, never felt like someone was trying to teach me a lesson about modern Pakistan. There's a rhythm to them that's almost hypnotic, and before you know it you're at the end of the story. And - something I often don't find in short stories - you actually feel like you've reached a real end, like you've been told all you need to know. Many of the stories are sad, even disturbing.

At one point one of the characters says, "It's as difficult to have a meaningful life with a lot of money as without. But he's clear that while the rich struggle to have a meaningful life, the poor struggle to have any life at all. There is a repeated acknowledgment that if you're poor you're at the mercy of fate, and fate is not usually kind.

And if you're a poor woman, you're doubly screwed. And about that. I'm not quite sure what I think about the women in these stories. Sometimes I felt that Mueenuddin just didn't understand females, other times he seemed spot on "They were feminine in their perceptions, could follow her braided impulses and desires What made me uncomfortable was that so many of the women seemed to be constantly scheming, trying to catch men, trap and trick them. But I suppose the men in these stories in their own way were doing the same.

Because I think in the Pakistan that Meenuddin writes about, change is coming from the outside, chaotically, without any sort of order or plan. So everyone is trying to grasp for whatever is within reach, trying to survive the transformation. And some people pull themselves up, and some people fall through the cracks. May 20, Raghu rated it it was ok. I picked up this book as it has had good reviews from writers I respect - like William Dalrymple and Salman Rushdie.

It has been a long time since I read a book by a Pakistani writer. Even this author, is a Pakistani-American rather than a native Pakistani. Two stories are set amongst the upper class members of the Harouni family and the rest are about lowly-paid I picked up this book as it has had good reviews from writers I respect - like William Dalrymple and Salman Rushdie. Two stories are set amongst the upper class members of the Harouni family and the rest are about lowly-paid employees in the extended household of the Harouni family. It is about landowners, their accountants, the young servant maids, cooks and the privileged children of the Harounis who live in far-off Paris or New York.

Honestly, the book paints a bleak and gloomy picture of Pakistani society as seen through the Harounis. I can't remember a single character who was cheerful and hopeful in spite of his conditions of living, rich or poor. The rich come off as unfeeling, selfish people, exploiting the men and women in their service. The poor women plot and scheme to become the mistresses of the powerful and better their living condition by offering sex in return.

The going is good for them as long as the rich man 'keeps' them. But they all end up on the losing side eventually as the men they sleep with are often old and die away. Once they die, the household elite simply see the women as 'cheap whores' and banish them from service returning them to their former misery. The other poor men in their service for decades end up being exploited by the corrupt police force, Apart from the Harounis, the one common thread in the stories is one of pessimism, as far as my reading goes.

I often wonder about books written by expatriate authors about their homelands. Partially, they seem to write for the 'foreign' audience because all this stuff would be exotic and more interesting for them. I doubt if a liberal Pakistani would be enamored by this book and its message. Even for an Indian like me, the setting and tenor of the social relations is quite familiar but I would believe that there is more to Pakistan than such gloom and heartlessness. It is depressing to read story after story that paints mostly the joylessness, inhumanity and the dark side of human beings.

It is a puzzle to me as to the number of positive reviews that the book has had. I wonder what I may have missed. It is possible that I am being less objective than others because of my roots in the subcontinent. But I feel the stories say as much about the author himself as it does about contemporary Pakistan. I would recommend it for reading to non-Pakistanis as a window into Pakistan but not necessarily a complete window. Thwarted again Daniyal Mueenuddin, a Pakistani American with the best of credentials, including a Yale Law degree, published works in the New Yorker and Granta, and extensive life experience among Midwestern Americans and rural Pakistanis, provides a compendium of stories loosely tied to the patriarchal figure of K.

Harouni, a wealthy fic Thwarted again Harouni, a wealthy fictional figure of acclaim, authority, and artful corruption. Alas, I make him sound far more interesting than he is portrayed by an author who has little power of description of his homeland, whose characters are cardboard thin grizzled, but wise peasants; conniving mistresses and servants; and arrogant, yet attractive and glib, elites , and whose dialogue sounds like it has been derived from mid-afternoon soap operas.

Strangely, the only story that conveys a strong sense of place is one that is centered in Paris. Of Pakistan, we see and feel nothing beyond it being warm, dusty, and often crowded. The author really did not have to return to his Pakistani roots to write these stories Nonetheless, he has been compared to Turgenev, Chekhov, Updike, Singer, and others. Yet, he fails to convey any aspect of the Pakistani experience and even in his comments seems confused about the nature of the social structure, which he describes as feudal rather than as an ossified economic and caste structure with remnants of a precapitalist system.

Pakistan is not comparable to medieval Europe; feudalism is not a blanket term to be applied to a very different agricultural process with its resulting particular social organization of labor, which is specific to the region. Aside from these issues, the stories are simply dull and unimaginative. To rephrase the old Lincoln adage: you can fool all of the critics some of the time.

Read the wonderful short stories of R. Narayan if you want to enjoy a splendid time on the Indian subcontinent. May 13, James Murphy rated it really liked it. Mueenuddin has given us 8 linked short stories about modern Pakistan as experienced by the landowner K. Harouni, members of his family, and others within his orbit, so that every stratum of that contemporary society seems to be touched. It's a portrait of a culture that is, to us, murky and complex. Understandably, strong characterizations need to be rooted in a work of such fertile scope, and Mueenuddin has succeeded with richly rounded people who are hopefully fatalistic, caring, and pragma Mueenuddin has given us 8 linked short stories about modern Pakistan as experienced by the landowner K.

Understandably, strong characterizations need to be rooted in a work of such fertile scope, and Mueenuddin has succeeded with richly rounded people who are hopefully fatalistic, caring, and pragmatic. What they all seem to have in common is courage. These stories are beautifully written and spooled out for the reader.

I didn't, couldn't, however, fix on any particular traits which I thought made them thematically literary. Engagingly told stories of engaging people. What struck me the most, though I had an idea beforehand, was the vast economic differences between the classes in Pakistan.

And that contentment is relative. The book didn't so much leave me breathless as looking at characters such as these and the way they live with the understanding that they'll continue to plod the same dusty roads for some time. These eight marvelous short stories give the reader an idea of Pakistan's society at all levels. A common thread is a wealthy landowner named K. Harouni, and each of the stories describes Pakistan's complicated feudal system from the perspective of the characters-- Harouni's friends and acquaintances, his subordinates, and his relatives. Sadly, women and the poor suffer in this tiered society regardless of their class, and many have a sense of resignation that their circumstance and tragedies These eight marvelous short stories give the reader an idea of Pakistan's society at all levels.

Sadly, women and the poor suffer in this tiered society regardless of their class, and many have a sense of resignation that their circumstance and tragedies are their due. Even when they work or scheme to to rise above their beginnings or to improve their social mobility, the sense of predetermination and failure prevails. Materialism seems to be the motivating force for all, as the rich want to get richer or maintain their status, and the others' actions are driven by the desire to move upwards. This is a powerful read. I have not been able to stop thinking about the stories since I finished it.

Put it on your to-read book! View all 8 comments. Aug 03, Jigar Brahmbhatt rated it really liked it. Nice, rounded, fully realised stories The interlinked narratives evoke the lives of peasants and landlords from multiple perspectives, generating a solid sense of place and character. Overall effect is better than a novel because the stories reduce the tediousness a novel can most-likely fall into. Good stuff. Mar 26, Angela rated it liked it. In Other Rooms, Other Wonders is an easily flowing collection of short stories in which the characters are linked somehow to the estate of K.

Harouni, a powerful landowner. Set in Islamabad and rural Pakistan, the collection endeavors to give a larger picture of the workings of Pakistani life, describing everyone from Harouni himself to his poorest servant. Mueenuddin does well at giving us a taste of the flavor and structure of Pakistani life.

Surprisingly, the two stories I found most compe In Other Rooms, Other Wonders is an easily flowing collection of short stories in which the characters are linked somehow to the estate of K. Surprisingly, the two stories I found most compelling were original to the book - "About a Burning Girl" and "Lily. Perhaps Mueenuddin is attempting to highlight the subtle differences at work when the poor servant, the middle-manager on the estate, or Harouni himself, is the man in question, or to reinforce the story lesson?

All in all, though, the collection is an interesting worthwhile read and a glimpse at life in a country of which most of us know very little. When Mueenuddin's descriptive writing is on, it is on , saturated with a color reminiscent of E. Some of my favorite bits appear in "About a Burning Girl": Mian Sarkar deserves not merely a thumbnail but a biography in two volumes--if it were possible to find out anything at all about him except his present rank and station. So far as I am aware, Mian Sarkar wore a cheap three-piece suit and a pair of slightly tinted spectacles of an already outmoded design on the day that he emerged from his mother's womb.

When he leaves the office in the evening, exactly at five, he doesn't turn a corner or get into a cab or a bus, he simply dematerializes. No one knows even what quarter of the city he lives in, much less his address. He drinks nothing but milk, one careful glassful each day at lunch, and becasue of his digestion he eats each day only a single cheese sandwich, on white untoasted bread, with the crust cut off, brought to him by a boy from a tea stall. They must stock the cheese for him especially.

Before speaking he clears his throat with a little hum, as if pulling his voice box up from some depth where he secretes it for safekeeping. His greatest feature, however, is his nose, a fleshy tubular object, gorged with blood, which I have always longed to squeeze, expecting him to honk like a bus. I sat eating toast with marmalade, poured a second cup of tea, and then picked up the Pakistan Times and took its crisp virginity, inhaling the scent of damp ink and newsprint.

I enjoy this paper because it gives me absolutely no information except that which is sponsored by the government. It never disrupts my morning. Apr 30, Ron rated it it was amazing. This is not the Pakistan of the news headlines, bombings, assassination, political strife, extremism. Instead these interrelated stories provide a Dickensian portrayal of lives lived at nearly every level of social strata - wealthy landowners, their descendants, and those who rely on them for their livelihood.

Like Dickens, there is as much grief and sorrow as joy in most of these lives, as fortunes rise and then often fall. Some readers here complain that the moral center of the stories is ambi This is not the Pakistan of the news headlines, bombings, assassination, political strife, extremism. Some readers here complain that the moral center of the stories is ambiguous, and that their world view is too often bleak. I find that the strength of the book, however; it avoids the easy answers of much fiction, accepting with a sense of wonder that in our efforts to find security, those very efforts can result in our undoing.

An unmarried relative of a rich man finds a niche for herself as an intimate in his household and then is scorned and dismissed by his daughters when he dies. An independent young woman is romanced by a handsome, educated, and idealistic young entrepreneur, and rather than living happily ever after, they discover that where there's no love, romance cannot sustain them. An old man benefits from the largesse of a wealthy man's American wife but finds the tables turned when he weds a mentally disabled girl who then disappears.

Only the most cunning and artfully manipulative survive in this world - not the innocent or the corrupt, but those who know how to take without over-reaching. Often short story collections suffer from being a hodgepodge of different styles, depending on the publications they were first written for. Mueenuddin's, however, are consistent from beginning to end. The stories overlap, while characters are from the same broad social milieu, and the writing style is always exquisitely precise.

Like a fine wine, nicely chilled. After a bit of a shaky start, this book and I managed to get on reasonably well together in the end. It's a collection of loosely connected short stories some repeating character and events that paint a picture of life in Pakistan. Not being an expert, I'm not sure if it's an accurate picture, but it focuses on both the poor and the wealthy and the way their lives both interact and are completely different from one another.

I found the first two or three stories rather shallow and the character After a bit of a shaky start, this book and I managed to get on reasonably well together in the end. I found the first two or three stories rather shallow and the characters rather one-dimensional. But then it started to get more interesting and the later stories were, for me, much more interesting and absorbing.

Rich men, rich women, poor men and poor women - all make themselves known in this book. As I say, I don't know how realistic it is, but it doesn't seem that anyone has much fun in the end. Several stories look for a while as though people might enjoy themselves, but you sort of know it isn't going to last. Most of the stories follow a similar pattern of giving us an introduction to the characters, tracking the main character through a significant event and then ending somewhat ambiguously.

I liked the rather vague endings that gave the impression that life carried on and that we had just seen a little bit of what is a continuum. Coincidentally, this book also tells a number of short stories that are related, some quite vaguely, by the characters or events in them.

For my personal taste, Jennifer Egan's book was far more accomplished and engaging I gave it 5 stars compared to the 3, maybe 3. Jun 01, Alan rated it really liked it Recommended to Alan by: www. Shelves: short-stories , read-in I was impressed with the writing and the author's control, his ability to elicit sympathy for the unsympathetic and his insight into disguised self interest, family bonds and the class system of the corner of Pakistan he writes about.

In many ways this could have been 18th century England with the land owning classes and their heirarchy of servants, the cook that always gets to sleep with the new maid, the mistress installed in a 'flat' on the estate, the letters of introduction required. Three I was impressed with the writing and the author's control, his ability to elicit sympathy for the unsympathetic and his insight into disguised self interest, family bonds and the class system of the corner of Pakistan he writes about.

Three of the stories cover the same ground - a desperate 'maid' winning the affections of the 'master', and enjoying the benefits but left without a bean when he dies. I've docked a star for this repetition. Some great characters portrayed, eg Nawabdin the Electrician who has many daughters: Another man might have thrown up his hands—but not Nawabdin.

The daughters acted as a spur to his genius, and he looked with satisfaction in the mirror each morning at the face of a warrior going out to do battle. Nawab of course knew that he must proliferate his sources of revenue—the salary he received from K. Harouni for tending the tube wells would not even begin to suffice. He set up a little one-room flour mill, run off a condemned electric motor—condemned by him. He tried his hand at fish-farming in a little pond at the edge of one of his master's fields. He bought broken radios, fixed them, and resold them. He did not demur even when asked to fix watches, though that enterprise did spectacularly badly, and in fact earned him more kicks than kudos, for no watch he took apart ever kept time again.

Other stories portray the elite, noticably 'Our Lady of Paris', a beautifully written story about a son taking his girlfriend to meet the matriarch of the family for approval. Jan 31, Drew rated it it was amazing. This is a wonderful book of linked stories. I'm usually no fan of short stories but these have enough commonalities that it feels like a novel. The stories are beautifully written and give a picture of life in contemporary Pakistan - both rural and urban - from the viewpoint of various social classes. The author has lived in both Pakistan and the U.

I strongly recommend this book! Absolutely loved all stories which are somewhat loosely connected. My favourite is Nawabdin electrician's though, his resoluteness and spartan lifestyle signifies the great Pakistani Punjabi stereotype. I also immensely enjoyed the interaction of the rich and affluent class with the ordinary as it is a game still played on a daily basis. Daniyal has indeed got a keen sense to empathise with the plight of the poor and the destitute. Can't wait for his next book. Jul 13, Elliott Turner rated it liked it. I really enjoyed this collection, even if, at about the halfway point, the stories seem to revolve around women who try to climb socially by marrying rich Pakistani men.

On the one hand, this probably happens and the stories are well constructed enough. It's also cool to see a male author write stories from a female POV. On the other hand, this recurrent theme could easily be flipped and be more interesting: what if, for example, a skanky Pakistani rich playboy tried to marry a nice, 3.

Miracles And Other Wonders ''the farmer''

On the other hand, this recurrent theme could easily be flipped and be more interesting: what if, for example, a skanky Pakistani rich playboy tried to marry a nice, farm girl and moved to her ranch and then was miserable? I loved the very last story about the man whose wife goes missing AND the story about the young couple in Paris vs the overbearing parents.

Jul 01, Paige rated it it was ok Recommends it for: actors who are portraying a depressed person. It's hard for me to give this book a rating in stars. I didn't dislike the writing. I liked the writing style perfectly well, actually. I just have an issue with the vast majority of short stories being depressing. This book certainly lives up to that stereotype, as every single story is plenty depressing--and th It's hard for me to give this book a rating in stars.

This book certainly lives up to that stereotype, as every single story is plenty depressing--and then some. The happiest story in the book is the first one, in which a man is shot several times by a stranger he tried to help, the stranger is subsequently shot, and the man lays next to this stranger while he's dying, refusing to forgive him understandably so and hurling abuse at him instead. But the book jacket says "these stories comprehensively illuminate a world" and says the stories describe "the advantages and constraints of social station. I certainly hope these stories don't "comprehensively illuminate a world," because there is really no joy to be had among these pages.

The tiny amount of joy that does exist seems to exist for the sole purpose of being crushed to tiny bits by the author. Now, disclaimer: I've never been to Pakistan.

suankarnchang.com/images/come-trovare/come-localizzare-un-cellulare-windows-7.php

Data Protection Choices

But I know that it is inhabited by human beings. I'm sure small victories, loving or at least respectful relationships, and fulfillment do happen in Pakistan, probably on a daily basis, but you would never guess it was so by reading this Pakistani author's book. It's all violence against women, unhappy and insecure men, power plays and dominance. I guess that kind of goes along with feudalism, but there is not a single character showing any kind of personal strength in the face of it. I come away from this book with the message that "Pakistanis are weak and violent and immoral, wrapped up in greed and pride and artificial facades.


  • In Other Rooms, Other Wonders, by Daniyal Mueenuddin | The Independent;
  • How Many More Should Die Before Waking Up To Ourselves.
  • Wanted: Galactic emperor – Age Of Wonders: Planetfall.

And so is joy and happiness and strength and fortitude. All of which were sorely lacking in this book. While some reviewers seemed to think the author was as one reviewer put it in the background wagging his finger, I felt that the author seemed okay with it all. Even the narration takes a pretty violent, non-compassionate view of people: one character is described with the phrase "when he became useful," as if doing hard manual labor for someone is the only determinant of a person's "usefulness.

I just think it shows a skewed portrait, and I think it's unfortunate that such a lauded book fails to show the people in Pakistan as complete human beings. Books like this are why I generally stay away from fiction. I don't mind reading something depressing if it's real, if it actually happens to people, because at least then I feel like I can do something about it, and marvel that actual people live through such hard times.

Memoirs and nonfiction are enlightening and show a fuller picture of people. This was just a bunch of made up stories where no characters really had any redeeming values--and if they do, horrible things happen to them to put them back in their place. I just don't take that view of the world. These characters weren't people, they were caricatures of misery.

I'm planning on reading In the Name of Honour: A Memoir because it's a memoir by a Pakistani woman who was sentenced to be gang-raped as punishment for something her 12 year old brother did "wrong. That's a much more real, more hopeful, more HUMAN story of suffering--if that's what you're looking for.

World fiction is popular these days, and I love it as much as anyone probably more than most , but in our enthusiasm for exotic settings, we shouldn't be blinded to the importance of strong plotting and characterization either. Unfortunately, this is a book that lacks those strengths.

In Other Rooms, Other Wonders is a group of eight loosely-connected and non-chronological short stories set in Pakistan, about people all connected in one way or another with a wealthy Pakistani family. The conne World fiction is popular these days, and I love it as much as anyone probably more than most , but in our enthusiasm for exotic settings, we shouldn't be blinded to the importance of strong plotting and characterization either. The connections are quite loose; not being a big fan of short stories, I was hoping the common threads would make the book read more like a novel, but it does not.

On the other hand, the individual stories often are not particularly well-structed either. Some like "Our Lady of Paris" read like chapters in a novel, without a clear beginning, middle or end--except that we don't see those characters again before or after.


  • Book Review?
  • A Life of Gwendolyn Brooks?
  • From Fort Henry to Corinth.
  • Like Angels on Jacobs Ladder: Abraham Abulafia, the Franciscans, and Joachimism!
  • Site Navigation!

The subject matter varies, but for the most part, the stories are either about lovers or about corruption, often combining the two. The three stories with male protagonists are primarily about corruption, and tend to be more unique and interesting and also shorter. The five with female protagonists are about lovers, and feel rather stale; in fact, three are almost exactly the same story with different names, in which a poor woman finds a place in a well-off man's household, seduces whatever older man is available to give her advantage, then falls on her face when a death puts an end to the affair.

By the third time I thought there would be some sort of twist, but there wasn't. Mueenuddin's female characters themselves tend to be flat and uninspired though the wealthy ones have a bit more complexity. The men are more passable, and probably should have had more starring roles. New Ages and Other Wonders. Compare Products. You have reached the maximum number of selection. You can select only upto 4 items to compare.

View Order. Free Installation. Hover to zoom. Be the first to review. Item not available at this location, please try another pincode. Delivery in days Free hrrhrhrhhr Delivery Charges: Rs. Additional Handling Charges are levied for other expenses incurred while delivering to your location. More Delivery Options. Delivery in days. Free Delivery Charges: Rs. Shipping Charges : Rs. We will let you know when in stock. Thank you for your interest You will be notified when this product will be in stock. Replacement is applicable for 7 days after delivery Know More. I agree to the. Terms and Conditions.

How It Works? IMEI Number. Exchange Discount Summary Exchange Discount -Rs.

New Ages and Other Wonders: Buy New Ages and Other Wonders Online at Low Price in India on Snapdeal

Final Price Rs. Apply Exchange. Other Specifications. The images represent actual product though color of the image and product may slightly differ. Was this information helpful to you? Yes No. Thank You for submitting your response. Customer Product Selfies. Seller Details View Store. Expand your business to millions of customers Sell this item on Snapdeal. Sold by.